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Conservation

50% of the land designated for conservation protection was inhabited or regularly used at the time it was slated for protection 

The United Nations estimate the range of conservation refugees worldwide is five million to tens of millions

Hundreds of thousands of people have died in the name of conservation from a western mindset.

Modern Conservation

Modern conservation efforts began in the U.S in the mid-1800s as people began to notice the negative impact the westward expansion of white settlers was having on the landscape and North American animal populations. Modern conservation efforts matured in the 1900s and as a result there are thousands of national parks and protected areas across the globe.

Well known figures such as Ansel Adams and John Muir were early advocates for a National 

Park system in the U.S and romanticized the Yosemite valley as an untouched virgin wilderness. One that should be protected for future generations. Adams, Muir, and many others acted as influences on how Americans viewed wilderness which was eventually defined in the 1964 Wilderness Act as "an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain." This definition and view of wilderness has been adopted by most organizations and countries around the world. Modern-day conservation efforts continue to focus on preserving "untouched wilderness," but this type of wilderness is a work of fiction. 

The reality is, those early romanticizers of wilderness were selling a myth. The land and wilderness they loved was not uninhabited. It was not untouched by man. When Muir arrived in California in 1868 the Yosemite valley was cared for and used by native tribes and had been for over 4,000 years. In fact, about 50% of land converted into protected areas across the globe was used or inhabited by indigenous people at the time the land was slated for protection. Within the U.S that number rises to about 80%.

Recent Studies

The American mindset is that for conservation to work, we must remove humankind from nature. This way of nature and conservation has spread around the globe, causing death and despair to millions of people. This Western mindset of conservation that has led to all this suffering isn't even helping conservation. Recent studies have shown that many groups of people evicted and forced from their lands actively contributed to the ecological health of the regions they populated and helped maintain biodiversity. 

The American mindset is that for conservation to work, we must remove humankind from nature. This way of nature and conservation has spread around the globe, causing death and despair to millions of people. This Western mindset of conservation that has led to all this suffering isn't even helping conservation. Recent studies have shown that many groups of people evicted and forced from their lands actively contributed to the ecological health of the regions they populated and helped maintain biodiversity. 

So why do large corporations keep pushing this Western idealogy of conservation and use aggressive vocabulary such as "battling for our planet"? Because they know modern conservation is a lie that sells outdoor apparel and gear. "If you buy our long-lasting quarter zip because it has cool colored mountains on the logo, we will go to war for our planet." But who are they going to war against? 

The modern mindset of conservation is rooted in racism and unscientific idealogy. It is time to realize that people are nature. There is value in all nature, but most especially in human life. That is why Ganett Outfitters works with conservation refugees and promotes a more human mindset of protecting and conserving our planet. 

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The Ahwahnechee lived in Yosemite Valley for centuries. It is believed that they may have lived in the area for as long as 7,000 years before they were evicted from the valley by the U.S. government in 1969.

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The Batwa are one of the oldest documented tribes in Africa, living for thousands of years as the “Keepers of the Forest.” They were evicted from their home so that the Bwindi Impenetrable Rain Forest could be made into a preserve to protect the 350 mountain gorillas. 

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